Sunday, July 13, 2014

Anglican Chant XXXIII: Psalm 102 (Domine, exaudi)

A great chant (or two, or three), sung here beautifully by the Choir of Ely Cathedral:

Here's what the YouTuber had to say at the page; the citation includes the words to the Psalm from the Coverdale Psalter:
The Choir of Ely Cathedral, under the direction of David Price & Paul Trepte, sing the hundredth and second Psalm to an Anglican chant for choir and organ. A sorrowful complaint of great afflictions. (1-11) Encouragement by expecting the performances of God's promises to his church. (12-22) The unchangeableness of God. (23-28)


Psalm 102. Domine, exaudi

HEAR my prayer, O Lord : and let my crying come unto thee.
2. Hide not thy face from me in the time of my trouble : incline thine ear unto me when I call; O hear me, and that right soon.
3. For my days are consumed away like smoke : and my bones are burnt up as it were a firebrand.
4. My heart is smitten down, and withered liked grass : so that I forget to eat my bread.
5. For the voice of my groaning : my bones will scarce cleave to my flesh.
6. I am become like a pelican in the wilderness : and like an owl that is in the desert.
7. I have watched, and am even as it were a sparrow : that sitteth alone upon the house-top.
8. Mine enemies revile me all the day long : and they that are mad upon me are sworn together against me.
9. For I have eaten ashes as it were bread : and mingled my drink with weeping;
10. And that because of thine indignation and wrath : for thou hast taken me up, and cast me down.
11. My days are gone like a shadow : and I am withered like grass.
12. But thou, O Lord, shalt endure for ever : and thy remembrance throughout all generations.
13. Thou shalt arise, and have mercy upon Sion : for it is time that thou have mercy upon her, yea, the time is come.
14. And why? thy servants think upon her stones : and it pitieth them to see her in the dust.
15. The heathen shall fear thy Name, O Lord : and all the kings of the earth thy majesty;
16. When the Lord shall build up Sion : and when his glory shall appear;
17. When he turneth him unto the prayer of the poor destitute : and despiseth not their desire.
18. This shall be written for those that come after : and the people which shall be born shall praise the Lord.
19. For he hath looked down from his sanctuary : out of the heaven did the Lord behold the earth;
20. That he might hear the mournings of such as are in captivity : and deliver the children appointed unto death;
21. That they may declare the Name of the Lord in Sion : and his worship at Jerusalem;
22. When the people are gathered together : and the kingdoms also, to serve the Lord.
23. He brought down my strength in my journey : and shortened my days.
24. But I said, O my God, take me not away in the midst of mine age : as for thy years, they endure throughout all generations.
25. Thou, Lord, in the beginning hast laid the foundation of the earth : and the heavens are the work of thy hands.
26. They shall perish, but thou shalt endure : they all shall wax old as doth a garment;
27. And as a vesture shalt thou change them, and they shall be changed : but thou art the same, and thy years shall not fail.
28. The children of thy servants shall continue : and their seed shall stand fast in thy sight.

Recording available on the disk 'Psalms of David: Vol. 8' (Priory Records UK).

At the Priory Records page, the composer listing reads "Ross, Ivor Atkins"; not sure who "Ross" is - perhaps it's R.R.Ross? -  but here's a bit about Ivor Atkins.  Interestingly, the image comes from the Library of Congress:
Sir Ivor Algernon Atkins (29 November 1869 – 26 November 1953) was the choirmaster and organist at Worcester Cathedral for over 50 years (1897-1950). He is well known for editing Allegri's Miserere with the famous top-C part for the treble. He is also well known for The Three Kings, an arrangement of a song by Peter Cornelius as a choral work for Epiphany.

Born into a Welsh musical family at Llandaff, Atkins graduated with a bachelor of music degree from The Queen's College, Oxford in 1892, and subsequently obtained a Doctorate in Music (Oxford). He was assistant organist of Hereford Cathedral (1890-1893) and organist of St Laurence Church, Ludlow from 1893 to 1897.
He composed songs, church music, service settings and anthems. With Edward Elgar he prepared an edition of Bach's St. Matthew Passion. Knighted in 1921 for services to music, Atkins was President of the Royal College of Organists from 1935 to 1936. He died in Worcester.

He was a friend of Edward Elgar, who in 1904 dedicated the third of his Pomp and Circumstance Marches to Atkins.

No comments:


Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...